Do eyelash serums have any side effects

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Eyelash growth serums promise long, beautiful lashes in just a few weeks. These serums are said to be “non-irritating” and “physician developed” to give you “long, sexy” lashes quickly, according to the ads. But lush lashes are not the sole benefit of the serums. These items may include chemicals that have unfavorable side effects.

We get it: you want to be able to have attractive and luscious eyelashes. But how safe are lash enhancers that claim to provide “natural” falsies? Anything you use in or near your eyes should, in general, be discussed with an eye doctor before usage. To assist you, we have created a list of resources and advice to aid you in your quest for long, beautiful lashes. Click on this link if you want to see the list of the most popular eyelash serums in 2022.

WHAT IS LASH SERUM AND HOW DOES IT WORK?

Many of these lash “serums” are actually lash conditioners with chemicals that assist restore moisture and prevent damage caused by mascara, or even other factors like the weather. Amino acids, collagen (proteins), and peptides (short chains of amino acids), and prostaglandins (naturally occurring substances in the body), are all included in over-the-counter lash serums, which may help eyelashes grow more quickly.

ARE THERE ANY DANGERS IN USING EYELASH SERUMS?

The following are some of the hazards connected with lash enhancing products, then we will talk about Prostaglandins:

  • Reaction to compounds that cause allergies
  • Unwanted hair growth in places other than the lash line where the serum has been applied
  • Eyes that are dry, scratchy, and/or red
  • Glands with clogged apertures

IF YOU ARE GOING TO USE EYELASH GROWTH SERUM, HERE ARE SOME ADVICE:

  • Before utilizing lash enhancing cosmetics, ALWAYS get medical counsel.
  • Before applying any serum to your lash line, remove your contact lenses; the serum can be absorbed by the contacts.
  • Apply eye cream as a barrier under your eyes before applying eyelash serum.
  • Do not use lash serums that have passed their expiration date!
  • If you have styes, macular edema, uveitis, pink eye, or other eye problems, do not use it until your doctor says otherwise.

Prostaglandins

Prostaglandins are contained in a number of eyelash serums we identified on store shelves. Glaucoma is an eye illness that can lead to blindness, and these medications are used to treat it. Glaucoma sufferers’ eyelashes have grown longer and darker as a side effect of their medication.

As a result of this discovery, prostaglandins have become a common element in eyelash serums.

Prostaglandins are a prescription drug, however lash serums (and other treatments) with low quantities of the drugs– 10mg per litre or less– are exempt. Because of this exception, they can be purchased without a prescription. 

However, the usage of prostaglandins in over-the-counter consumer items has raised health concerns, even at low quantities.

After allegations of “severe unwanted consequences” such as swollen eyelids, burning eyes, and hyperpigmentation, the European Commission launched an investigation into the safety of prostaglandins in cosmetics.

Eyelash serums containing prostaglandins are not allowed to be sold without a prescription in several countries, such as Australia and Canada. One brand was taken off the shelves in Australia in 2018 because it was discovered that the distributor was selling it in beauty salons without permission.

Possibility of irreparable consequences

A glaucoma specialist in Wellington, is concerned about the possibility of these products causing irreparable negative effects.

Prostaglandins can be powerful even at very low amounts.

 Others [glaucoma] individuals have red eyes, some have darker irises, some have long dark eyelashes, and some have a sunken appearance due to orbital tissue loss around the eye.

While the majority of negative effects can be reversed by discontinuing use of the product, this is not always the case.

Patients who use glaucoma drops to safeguard their vision are closely monitored by their doctors, but others who use cosmetics may be ignorant of the adverse effects. Doctors suggest that all products should have warnings about these dangers.

The most likely long-term or permanent adverse effects would include atrophy of the orbital tissue, resulting in a sunken eye, or increased pigmentation on the eyelid, resulting in a panda eye or eye shadow appearance.

In a 2020 study of 154 consumers who had tried over-the-counter serums, it was discovered that 44% had quit using them. The most prevalent reason was that the adverse effects were too much to bear.

While manufacturers are eager to market the benefits of eyelash serums, information on the hazards is more difficult to come across. The only information concerning possible adverse effects is usually on leaflets inside the sealed boxes in minuscule font.

There is a higher risk for some customers. Prostaglandins are more likely to cause negative effects in cancer patients.